OUR FIRST 3-D POST!!! – Jack Laxer at the Getty

CLICK ON THE THREE THUMBNAILS BELOW TO VIEW ANIMATED GIFS. IF YOU’D RATHER VIEW THE IMAGES SIDE BY SIDE, WE’VE POSTED THEM AFTER THE JUMP.

stereopticon_smWHAT: Photography in 3-D: Capturing the Built Environment, Photography by Jack Laxer
WHEN: Sunday, April 11, 2010, 3:30pm – 5:30pm
WHERE: Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall
COST: Course fee $15 (includes 3-D glasses and parking); reservations required. Call (310) 440-7300

My grandmother owned a stereopticon, and as a child I was fascinated by it. I still have it, and it looks *just* like the contraption on the right. Basically, during the early days of photography the stereopticon was an invention that helped people of the late 19th century collect the sights of the world without leaving home… a magical machine displaying the most exotic wonders of the world in 3D so people could fantasize about being there in person. 3D may be all the rage when it comes to watching movies right now, but the art of 3D photography is still more amazing to me somehow.

The other day I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Jack Laxer who will be showing his master 3D/stereo photography of Modernist architecture at the Getty this Sunday (complete with 3D glasses provided!) . When he was kind enough to offer me the opportunity to feature some of his work on HiddenLA this week, I wasn’t sure how I was going to do it justice but I knew I was up to the challenge. Since I can’t exactly hand out stereopticans to all of you, I decided to try turning them into animated gifs… and it actually kinda works! Obviously the effect will be much better if you go to his Getty event and check out his work in person with 3D glasses on your face, but this’ll give you a taste. One warning though… before you click on the thumbnails below, just please be sure you aren’t epileptic. Oh, and just know if you haven’t had coffee yet, you probably won’t need any after viewing them. ;)

CLICK ON THUMBNAILS BELOW FOR ANIMATED GIFSThe Huddle in Palm Springs, a long-gone coffee shop Denny's in Colton The Holiday Bowl











CLICK ON IMAGES BELOW FOR LARGER VIEWS
18-Huddle-Palm-springs-coffee-shot-now-gone-950
124-Holiday-Bowl-&-Dining-950
11-Dennys-orange-chairs-Coltom-950

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11 Responses to “OUR FIRST 3-D POST!!! – Jack Laxer at the Getty”

  1. David says:

    How is this 3d? it just makes me have a headache…. haha help!

    • lynnster says:

      If you look at the two images side by side (with special glasses on), this is how 3D photography is created. We just did our best to fake it. If you take a piece of paper and put it between your eyes and the two images, you might be able to see them as 3D… try that! :)

      • Kris Neilson says:

        I had some ‘splain’n to do when my family caught me with my stereopticon up against the 3D computer images……(it works beautifully)

  2. Photomatt says:

    Saw this as a smaller exhibit last year.
    Very cool.
    Well worth checking out.
    Some rights & lefts were flipped, requiring Cross-Eyed viewing.
    Wonder if they fixed that.

  3. April says:

    If you could ever do those ‘magic eye’ puzzles you can see the 3D image.

  4. Joselle says:

    If you pick a point in the middle of one of the side by side pictures and let yourself go kind of glassy-eyed, you can get the full 3d effect without glasses! It takes a little practice. You know how when you’re just staring into space sometimes you “unfocus?” Do that.

  5. Whetherperson says:

    Congratulations on this new direction. I just print them out at the right size, cut them and put them in my 100 year-old viewer.

  6. gerg says:

    Yay, free-view. The images look beautiful.

    • JB says:

      These stereo images are “flopped”–in other words, the left-hand image is meant to be viewed by the right eye, and vice versa, so if you try to view them by crossing your eyes and making the images overlap, the image will be in reverse 3-D, with the foreground in the background. You either have to print them out and view with a stereoscope, which automatically reverses the image order, or you must cut out the images and reverse their positions so that when you use your own eyeball method, the 3-D effect is correct.

      • lynnster says:

        Huh. That’s how Jack’s people sent ‘em to me so I figured they were right. Whooops! :(

        • Hillary says:

          I’m not sure how JB is viewing these stereo pairs, but they are set up for DIRECT free-viewing, not cross-eyed viewing. It’s precisely because the images have not been flopped that makes them compatible with viewing aids as others have found.

          These are wonderful! Too bad I’m on the wrong coast.

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